Category: News

   

On January 20, 2021, the third expert session “How to extract dividends from data for socio-economic development” will be held as part of a cycle of expert sessions on data policy

The World Bank, in collaboration with the Institute of the Information Society and other Russian partners, is organizing a series of expert sessions on data policy “Data as a key factor in the competitiveness of the Russian economy”.

The discussion cycle consists of three sessions, the first of which, organized jointly with the National Center for Digital Economy of Moscow State University, was devoted to discussing Russia’s policy in the field of ensuring trust in the data ecosystem.

The second session, organized jointly with the Agency for Strategic Initiatives, addressed policy issues for managing data throughout its life cycle.

We invite you to take part in the third expert session, which will be held on January 20, 2021 in the online conference mode from 16.30 to 18.30 Moscow time.

The topic of the upcoming conference is “How to extract dividends from data for socio-economic development.”

This session, co-hosted by the World Bank and the Center for Strategic Research, will discuss current Russian policy issues related to the value of data for the country’s socio-economic development.

The session will be moderated by Vladislav Onishchenko, president of the Center for Strategic Research, and Oleg Petrov, lead digital transformation specialist of the World Bank. Among the speakers: Renault Seligman (Country Director for Russia of the World Bank), Andrew Stott (senior consultant of the World Bank, formerly Head of data.gov.uk) and Declan Deasy (formerly director of DIGIT, European Commission) and leading Russian experts.

If you wish to participate in the session, please inform the following contact persons by January 18, 2021:

   

With the participation of IIS, a draft national standard on the framework and application process of the big data reference architecture has been developed


The Technical Committee for Standardization “Artificial Intelligence” (TC 164) functioning on the basis of RVC submitted the first version of the standard “Information Technologies. Reference Architecture for Big Data. Part 1: Structure and Application Process” for public discussion. The draft standard was developed by the National Center for Digital Economy of Lomonosov Moscow State University and the Institute of the Information Society.

The above mentioned national standard is one of five standards, which refer to the big data reference architecture and is a Russian-language adaptation of the international technical report ISO/IEC TR 20547-1:2020 Information Technology – Big Data Reference Architecture – Part 1: Framework and Application Process.

The draft national standard contains a description of the framework of the big data reference architecture, and also provides a solution to the problem of mapping the possible big data use cases in the reference architecture. The provisions of the national standard can be used by organizations to consistently describe their architecture and its implementations with respect to the roles/actors and their concerns as well as the underlying technology.

The document provides a conceptual view of the big data reference architecture, as well as the underlying concepts: reference architecture, interest, stakeholder, scope, architecture framework, user and functional views, application process, stakeholder identification, etc.

The presented draft national standard, along with other parts of the ISO / IEC 20547-X international series of standards, will contribute to the effective use of the big data technology to solve economic and social problems in the implementation of the national program “Digital Economy of the Russian Federation”.

“The big data reference architecture presented in the standard will ensure the interoperability of big data systems created in the country, their compatibility and opportunities for further development. The creation of a national big data ecosystem is impossible without complying with the general requirements of working in a distributed environment, and a series of international standards ISO / IEC 20547-X, consistently adapted as national standards, serves this purpose,” says Yuri Hohlov, chairman of the Data Subcommittee (PC 02) as part of TC 164.

The draft standard was developed by the National Center for the Digital Economy of Moscow State University (within the framework of the project of the NTI Competence Center for Big Data Storage and Analytics) and the Institute of the Information Society. The coordination of work on the agreement and approval of the document is carried out by PC 02 “Data” on the basis of Moscow State University, operating as part of TC 164 “Artificial Intelligence”.

The first version of the standard is available at bigdata-msu.ru/standards. Comments on the project are accepted by e-mail bigdata-wg02@digital.msu.ru until February 27, 2021. Based on the results of public discussion, the version of the standard will be supplemented and approved by TC 164 “Artificial Intelligence”, after which the document is planned to be submitted to Rosstandart.

Source: https://www.rvc.ru/press-service/news/company/160376/

National Center for Digital Economy (NCDE), Lomonosov Moscow State University, was founded in 2017 by decision of the Board of Trustees of Moscow University at a meeting chaired by Russian President Vladimir Putin. The purpose of the Center is to promote the digital economy development in Russia. In 2018, the NTI Competence Center for Big Data Storage and Analytics was created within the NCDE structure. The activities of PC 02 are supported by the NTI Competence Center for Big Data Storage and Analytics at the Moscow State University.

The Institute of the Information Society is an independent research and service organization established in 1998 at the initiative of renowned specialists in the field of information technology, telecommunications and information policy with the aim of developing the information society in Russia.

The Technical Committee for Standardization “Artificial Intelligence” (TC 164) was created in 2019 at the initiative of RVC with the support of the Ministry of Industry and Trade of the Russian Federation and Rosstandart. TC 164 is a national mirror of the relevant international subcommittee ISO/IEC JTC 1 SC 42 “Artificial Intelligence”. As part of TC 164 there is a subcommittee “Data” (PC 02), whose secretariat is run by the National Center for Digital Economy of Moscow State University.

   

IIS wishes you a Happy New Year!

Dear colleagues, partners and friends!

Saying goodbye to this unusual 2020, let’s remember the good things that it taught us6 and these are patience and the ability to adapt to unusual circumstances.

We have become more attentive to our health and the health of our loved ones, we have revalued many familiar things.

We mastered a lot of new skills and finally got to things that we had been putting off for a long time. Many of us have even been able to acquire new professions by studying online. Someone switched to a healthy lifestyle, someone picked up dumbbells, someone re-read his favorite books…

Let us wish you excellent mood, wise calmness, new ambitions, interesting projects and, of course, health and personal happiness in the coming year!

Happy New Year!

   

The last issue of the Information Society journal for 2020 is released

The full version of the 6th issue for 2020, in which 7 articles were published, can be viewed on the journal’s website.

In the past year, we published exactly 50 articles by various authors from Astrakhan, Volgograd, Voronezh, Yekaterinburg, Moscow, Nalchik, Novosibirsk, Orel, Perm, Pskov, Rostov-on-Don, St. Petersburg, Saransk, Stavropol, Tomsk, Yakutsk – we have not yet had such a coverage of Russian territory. We had four foreign researchers from Baku, from the National Academy of Sciences of Azerbaijan. Among the authors of this year’s articles there were 46 candidates of science and 21 doctors of science. There were also graduate students, specialists without academic degrees, and even students for whom our journal is by no means closed, if they write together with their mentors or send interesting and high-quality independent works.

The most popular topics were “Digital Economy” (8 publications), “Socio-economic aspects of the information society” (6), “Education in the information society” (6), “Information society technologies” (6) and “Information society and the media” (5), which naturally reflected the general situation that influenced our life in 2020. This was followed by the headings “Human in the information society”, “Information society and state power”, “Trust and security in the information society” (3 publications each), followed by “Culture in the information society”, “Science and innovation in the information society”, “Information society and law”, “Measuring the information society” (2 publications each). The topics “Fundamental research in the field of information society” and “Foreign experience. International cooperation” were populated only by one publication each. But the topics “Leaders of the information society”, “Information society: policy and drivers”, “Healthcare in the information society”, “Sports and tourism in the information society” remained empty.

The above statistics suggest that we need to purposefully work with scientists and specialists from different fields of knowledge, especially those that remained uncovered this year. We also plan to work more actively with foreign authors, publishing their works in English. We have already taken the first step on this path in the fifth issue of our journal and we are not going to stop there.

   

With the support of IIS, an expert session “Data as Infrastructure” was held under the auspices of the World Bank

On December 15, 2020, the online cycle of expert sessions on data policy “Data as a key factor in the competitiveness of the Russian economy” was continued. As part of the second session of the cycle, an expert discussion on the topic “Data as Infrastructure” took place. The session was organized by the World Bank in cooperation with the Agency for Strategic Initiatives (ASI) with the support of the Institute of the Information Society in order to clarify the provisions of the forthcoming World Bank report on the data economy in Russia.

Let us recall that the first expert session, organized by the World Bank jointly with the National Center for Digital Economy of the Lomonosov Moscow State University and the Institute of the Information Society, was held on November 24, 2020 and was devoted to discussing Russia’s policy in the field of ensuring trust in the data ecosystem.

The key topic of the second panel is the management of data throughout its entire life cycle based on a reliable and efficient data infrastructure. In the forthcoming World Bank report, data infrastructure is understood as a digital infrastructure that facilitates data exchange and sharing.

The meeting was moderated by Vera Adaeva, head of the ASI Center for digital development, and Oleg Petrov, lead digital transformation specialist of the World Bank.

Vera Adaeva described the key tasks of the expert discussion: to look at the practices already presented in the report and express an attitude towards them; to suggest new practices and formulate recommendations.

Oleg Petrov drew attention to the fact that after the publication of the report “Competing in Digital Age“, the World Bank began preparing a study on the development of the data economy and data management policy in Russia. A new World Development Report 2021 “Data for Better Lives” is now being prepared and will be published in a few months.

Renaud Seligmann, Country Director for Russia of the World Bank, noted in his opening remarks that a future report on data policy in Russia will raise data management issues that are strategically important for the further development of the economy: the development of a data management system for federal and regional levels; the means by which access to the national data resources of the authorities, business and citizens is created; consistent governance across the entire data ecosystem, updating and coordinating applicable rules, regulations and standards.

The World Bank study is based on a conceptual framework for analyzing national data policies in the leading countries of the world, which consists of three main components: 1) data as infrastructure (policies designed to ensure reliable data governance); 2) data trust (policies that build and maintain trust in the data ecosystem and its associated institutions); 3) data value (a policy that encourages and facilitates the creation of value through data).

Andrew Stott, WB Consultant and one of the authors of the report, elaborated on the content of the first component. Considering data as an infrastructure involves analyzing the following aspects: data management, information security, quality and standards, master data / de-duplication.

One of the Russian authors of the report, Yuri Hohlov, Chairman of IIS Board of Directors, spoke about the peculiarities of using data as an infrastructure in Russia.

“We stress that a prerequisite for the use of data by various stakeholders at the national level should be the presence of a mature digital infrastructure for data transmission, storage and processing,” the speaker noted.

He outlined large-scale national projects for the development of telecommunications infrastructure for working with data and for the formation of a computing infrastructure.

“One of the lagging zones for Russia is the development of a supercomputer infrastructure for working with data, a high-performance computing infrastructure. Unfortunately, we are losing our positions in the top 500, despite the launch of Christophari, the most powerful supercomputer in Russia, by Sberbank in 2019,” the expert shared.

Turning to industrial digital platforms, Yuri Hohlov said: “In order to get the maximum benefit, to receive effects and dividends from the use of data, it is necessary to develop digital platforms in which these data are processed. Recent trend not only at the global level, but also in Russia is the formation of digital platforms ecosystems, which are characteristic of advanced business. Here I would like to highlight several large projects to create digital ecosystems for working with data that are being implemented in Russia. These are the projects of Sberbank, Yandex, Mail.ru Group, MTS and other companies. A powerful consolidation of data processing is taking place as they plunge into ecosystems of interconnected digital platforms that previously solved separate problems, but now provide the entire range of services for the user via one single superapp.

According to Yuri Hohlov, the ecosystem of digital platforms of Russian authorities is developing along the same path: “We started a decade ago with the e-Government Infrastructure, which consists of a number of components, and supplement it with new digital platforms, which will allow working with government data not only to solve the government tasks in interacting with businesses and citizens, but also by providing services and data collected in government platforms to businesses and citizens for their interaction with each other.” The expert also noted that large data sets are created, used and managed by academia, whо are also interested in working with data.

At the end of his speech, Yuri Hohlov presented conclusions and recommendations, which are mainly addressed to the federal government. In addition, according to the speaker, it is important to address recommendations to other stakeholders, including business, civil society and the academia.

Two Russian experts, Mikhail Petrov, director of the Digital transformation department of the Accounts Chamber of the Russian Federation, and Ivan Begtin, general director of the Association of Data Market Participants, gave their detailed comments on the provisions contained in the chapter “Data as Infrastructure” of the draft report.

In response to Ivan Begtin’s speech, Yuri Hohlov noted that Russia needs a clearly formulated national data strategy. At the same time, according to him, the concept of the National Data Management System can hardly pretend to be such a strategy. “Apparently, this should become the main recommendation of the report: Russia needs its own national data strategy, addressed to all stakeholders (government, business, civil society, academia),” Yuri Hohlov said.

Then a panel discussion took place, which was attended by:

  • Grigory Ostapenko, deputy head of Rosstat;
  • Olga Parkhimovich, open government data specialist, Information Culture NGO;
  • Alexander Malakhov, head of digital development, Center for Strategic Research;
  • Svetlana Openysheva, head of regional state government institution “Government for Citizens” (Ulyanovsk region);
  • Anna Serebryanikova, president of the Big Data Association;
  • Igor Agamirzyan, vice president of the National Research University Higher School of Economics;
  • Nikita Utkin, chairman of Technical Committee on Standardisation “Cyber-physical systems” (TC 194), head of RVC programs;
  • Alexey Efremov, leading researcher, Center for Public Administration Technologies, RANEPA.

Yuri Hohlov, together with the moderators of the session, thanked the experts for their comments, noting: “Our task is not only to have a vertical dimension of data governance associated with the public administration in Russia (we are talking about the federal and regional levels, and also about the level of local self-government). But no less important are the culture of data governance and the formation of a data ecosystem that extends to other branches of public administration (legislative, judicial).”

He also announced a third panel session on the value of data, as well as a discussion on data regulatory issues. These meetings are scheduled to take place in January 2021.

The event was also attended by Tatiana Ershova, IIS general director.

   

On December 15, 2020, the second expert session “Data as Infrastructure” will be held as part of a cycle of expert sessions on data policy

The World Bank, in collaboration with Russian partners, is holding a series of expert sessions on data policy issues “Data as a Key Factor of the Competitiveness of the Russian Economy”.

The first expert session organized by the World Bank together with the National Center for Digital Economy of Lomonosov Moscow State University and the Institute of the Information Society, was held on November 24, 2020 as an online conference and was devoted to discussing Russia’s policy in the field of ensuring trust in the data ecosystem.

As part of the second expert session, which the World Bank is conducting jointly with the Agency for Strategic Initiatives with the support of the Institute of the Information Society, an expert discussion on the current Russian policy of data governance throughout their life cycle based on ensuring a reliable and efficient data infrastructure will take place.

In a data-driven economy, building trust through transparent data governance and use policies is essential, requiring attention to the entire data ecosystem. National governments play a key role in ensuring equal conditions for participants of the data ecosystem in terms of security and transparency. As an important producers and consumers of data, governments need to make strategic decisions about how they position themselves within the data ecosystem, and how this ecosystem as a whole has to be managed and regulated.

In the near future, the Russian government will need to address issues of strategic importance for the future development of a data-driven economy. These include the future directions and scope of the data governance system development at the federal and regional levels; the means by which access to national data resources from government, business and citizens is provided; consistent governance across the entire ecosystem; updating and coordinating existing rules, regulations and interoperability standards.

A solid infrastructure base is essential for further development. In the forthcoming World Bank report, data infrastructure is understood as a digital infrastructure that facilitates data exchange and sharing.

The session will be moderated by Vera Adaeva, head of the Center for digital development of the Agency for Strategic Initiatives, and Oleg Petrov, lead digital transformation specialist of the World Bank.

   

IIS took an active part in organizing and conducting the first expert session on data policy

On November 24, a series of expert sessions on data policy issues “Data as a key factor in the competitiveness of the Russian economy” was launched. As part of the first session, an expert discussion of Russia’s policy in the field of ensuring trust in the data ecosystem took place. The first session of the cycle was organized by the World Bank in cooperation with the National Center for Digital Economy of Lomonosov Moscow State University and the Institute of the Information Society in order to clarify the provisions of the forthcoming World Bank report on the data economy in Russia.

The session was opened by Renaud Seligmann, Country Director for Russia of the World Bank. The speaker said that over the past year, the World Bank, in cooperation with representatives of government authorities, development institutions, academia and private business in Russia, conducted a study to determine strategic objectives in the field of national data use policy. Based on numerous interviews and events with the participation of Russian and international experts, a draft analytical report on the development of the data economy in Russia was prepared.

However, the events of 2020 (including the coronavirus pandemic and the exceptional measures taken in connection with it to the massive use of data-based management principles) made researchers think about a partial revision of some of the conclusions of the draft report. “Today, with our partners – colleagues from the Institute of the Information Society and the National Center for Digital Economy of Lomonosov Moscow State University – we want to launch a series of expert discussions on the development of the data economy in Russia, and start with the most pressing topic of today – a policy aimed at ensuring trust in data, ”said Renaud Seligmann.

“If the population does not trust the state with their personal data and does not believe that the data will be safe in the hands of the government, then people will not share them. And that can be a real problem. What will be the result of such a policy if there is no trust? Therefore, the national policy should be aimed both at ensuring the protection of personal data and at the effective use of technological solutions, ”said Renault Seligmann in his speech.

Prasanna Lal Das, lead knowledge management officer of the World Bank and the lead author of the forthcoming report, spoke about the conceptual framework for analyzing national data policies of the leading countries of the world, which was the basis for the study. This schema, developed by the World Bank, has three main components: data value (policies that encourage and facilitate the creation of value through data); data trust (policies that build and maintain trust in the data ecosystem and its associated institutions); data as infrastructure (policies designed to ensure reliable data management).

Yuri Hohlov, Chairman of the Board of Directors of the Institute of the Information Society, head of the project “Monitoring and Standardization of the Development and Use of Big Data Storage and Analysis Technologies in the Digital Economy of the Russian Federation” voiced the recommendations presented in the draft report on ensuring trust in the data. Yuri Hohlov focused on such aspects of this issue as personal data, data ethics, sovereign internet and data localization.

Alexey Efremov, Leading Researcher, Center for Public Administration Technologies, RANEPA, gave a detailed commentary on the section of the draft report devoted to ensuring trust in data.

Further, within the framework of the panel and open discussions, 13 experts also expressed their opinion on the recommendations presented:

  • Vasily Pushkin, director of the Digital economy development department of the Ministry of Economic Development of Russia;
  • Vera Adaeva, head of the Center for digital development, Agency for Strategic Initiatives;
  • Vladislav Onishchenko, president of the Center for strategic research;
  • Anna Serebryanikova, president of the Big Data Association;
  • Igor Agamirzyan, vice president of the National Research University Higher School of Economics;
  • Ivan Begtin, general director of the Association of Data Market Participants;
  • Sergey Garbuk, chairman of the Technical committee for standardization “Artificial Intelligence” (TC 164);
  • Alexey Borovkov, vice-rector for advanced projects, Peter the Great St. Petersburg Polytechnic University;
  • Sayan Dorzhiev, Gartner Sales Director;
  • Alexander Malakhov, head of digital development, Center for Strategic Research;
  • Vladislav Shershulsky, director of advanced technologies at Microsoft Russia;
  • Nikita Utkin, chairman of TC 194 “Cyber-physical systems”, head of RVC programs;
  • Pavel Konotopov, project manager of the analytical center “Forum”.

In his speech, Sergei Garbuk, in particular, mentioned the Data subcommittee (PC 02), which is part of TC 164, the secretariat of which is performed by the National Center for Digital Economy of Lomonosov Moscow State University within the framework of the NTI Competence Center program on big data.

The moderator of the meeting, Tatiana Ershova, general director of the Institute of the Information Society, thanked the participants for their active participation in the discussion of the section of the report and expressed hope for the same productive cooperation in the next sessions of the cycle.

“The World Bank is currently conducting global national research on data-driven development. These issues are essential for the economic, social, political agenda around the world. The problems raised during this discussion, especially in the context of the crisis caused by the pandemic, are of very great importance not only for Russia, but also for other countries. Their understanding will contribute to universal prosperity and the fight against extreme poverty on the entire planet, ”Tatiana Ershova noted.

“I would like to touch upon one more aspect related exclusively to Russia: the work on the preparation of the Russian-language version of the report … was extremely important for the development of the Russian-language terminological base in the field of the digital economy … The National Center for Digital Economy in 2019-2020 based on the results of the corresponding research work within the framework of the state assignment created a glossary, which currently includes 210 basic terms with English equivalents, synonyms and definitions. We hope that this work will be very useful to the Russian expert community, ” added Tatiana Ershova.

Moderator Oleg Petrov, lead digital transformation specialist of the World Bank, also thanked the session participants, noting that the experts’ comments would be carefully studied and taken into account when preparing the final version of the report. The moderator shared that in December it is planned to hold a session on data as an infrastructure, in January – sessions on the value of data and legal aspects in a similar area. “We hope that the work will be completed by the end of January, the report will be published shortly after that,” said Oleg Petrov.

   

Tatiana Ershova appeared in the program “Good Question” on the information channel #GOVORITMOSKVA


On November 23, 2020, Tatiana Ershova, General Director of the Institute of the Information Society and editor-in-chief of the scientific and analytical journal Information Society, together with the presenter Anastasia Onishko in the program “Good Question” on the #GOVORITMOSKVA news channel discussed the topic of a new reform of the state apparatus in Russia in the context of digital transformation.

The discussion was based on the main theses of the interview with the head of the government apparatus Dmitry Grigorenko “About moving in the service” about the essence and goals of reforming the state apparatus. The government plans to optimize the number of civil servants, introduce a unified standard for the structure of state departments and create an effective model of activity, and all this in just three months. This causes understandable skepticism both in the system of public administration and among citizens, since over the past ten years, attempts to reform in this area have not led to much success.

Tatiana Ershova spoke in favor of such a reform if it serves to strengthen the power of the people and preserve the social orientation of the state, which is enshrined, respectively, in Articles 3 and 7 of the Constitution of the Russian Federation.

Digital technologies can fully contribute to the development of democracy, increase the activity and responsibility of the population in solving important political issues. Given the scale of Russia, its history and the formed mentality, this may take several decades – in contrast to small European states, which traditionally and consistently lead in the ratings of the development of the information society, e-government, etc., for example, Iceland, Finland, Sweden, Estonia, etc.

The conversation also touched upon such policy issues as creating a favorable environment for doing business, overcoming corruption, increasing the transparency of government – digital technologies can help to solve them, and trust in which must be strengthened in every possible way.

You can listen to the audio recording of the conversation directly on the website of the information channel.

   

Yuri Hohlov took part in an educational meetup as part of the Development Program for Anti-Crisis Leaders and Teams of the Digital Economy


Innopolis University, with the support of the Digital Economy organization, within the framework of the Program for the Development of Anti-Crisis Leaders and Digital Economy Teams (CLIC), is conducting a series of educational meetups for the constituent entities of Russia with the participation of representatives of the Russian scientific and expert community, representatives of leading Russian companies in the digital economy, federal and regional authorities.

During the sessions, experts discuss barriers to achieving digital maturity in priority sectors of the economy and social sphere and possible ways to overcome them through the prism of international and Russian experience. At the same time, experts focus on the economy of Russian enterprises and regions, the national economy, changing business models and ensuring clear economic, social, and managerial efficiency when using digital solutions.

The first educational meetup was held on October 23, 2020. The experts discussed the conceptual issues of the development of the digital economy in the regions, the national strategy for the development of artificial intelligence, the experience of using the “digital” on the example of the Udmurt Republic, as well as the key project of the digital transformation of Rosstat for the transition to data-based management – the creation of a digital platform for providing analytical data and systems of operational statistics.

The CLIK program provides for the training of data managers (CDO) within the framework of the federal project “Human Resources for the Digital Economy”. The operator of the project is University 2035. In 2020, more than 5000 anti-crisis leaders and 500 teams of the digital economy will be trained at the Innopolis University. Within the framework of the acceleration block from the University of 2035, more than 500 data projects will be prepared that solve practical and urgent problems of digital development of business and regions, including the creation of popular services available to the population in a “one click” format.

Yuri Hohlov was one of the experts of the CLIK program who took in the first meetup. He was presented as Chairman of the IIS Board of Directors, Scientific Director of the IIS Basic Department of Digital Economy at the Russian University of Economics named after G.V. Plekhanov, full member of the Russian Engineering Academy, strategic consultant and practitioner in the development and use of ICT for socio-economic development.

Under his leadership, hundreds of projects for the development of the information society at the global, national, regional and local levels have been completed. Author of several monographs and more than 200 articles, leader or member of international (UN, World Bank, World Economic Forum, etc.) and national (Council under the President of the Russian Federation for the Development of the Information Society, Expert Council under the Government of the Russian Federation, working groups under the ANO Digital economics ”, etc.) expert councils.

For more information (in Russian) please refer to  https://data-economy.ru/tpost/itnz4lyk71-universitet-innopolis-i-organizatsiya-ts.

   

Please meet the fifth issue of the Information Society journal for 2020

In this issue we have posted ten articles by authors from Baku, Voronezh, Yekaterinburg, Moscow and St. Petersburg, dedicated to various aspects of digitalization.

This is the impact of digital technologies on the development of international trade (section “Digital Economy”), and a possible strategy for the safe and responsible implementation of artificial intelligence based on a human-centered approach (the section “The Human in the Information Society”), and the creation of the informational and technological basis of Justice of Peace in the region and the use of big data analytics to model the public sector of the future (under the heading “Information Society and State Power”).

The section “Education in the Information Society” examines the problems and prospects for the development of literacy in the field of working with data as one of the basic digital competencies, the use of digital educational technologies during the coronavirus pandemic, and the introduction of digital technologies in military education.

The thematic section “Trust and Security in the Information Society” has been supplemented with interesting material on the use of folklore to identify and prevent the propaganda of crimes and violent acts.

The section “Information Society and Mass Media” contains an article on the transformation of print media in accordance with the business models of the platform economy. And in the section “Measuring the Information Society”, based on the results of market monitoring, the benefits associated with the use of digital technologies in Russian manufacturing enterprises are investigated. For the first time in the history of the journal, we have published an article in English and intend to continue this practice.

All materials of the issue are freely available on the new digital platform of the journal (texts primarily in Russian with English metadata and abstracts).